In search of…

I’m on a quest to find this radio. Have you got this in a drawer at home? It’s called an EXPO 70.
 
When I was a kid, my father gave me this tiny thing. He was in the Australian Navy and trips to Asia often had him returning home with all kinds of new gadgets. This little radio was one of them. He gave it to me and then I lost it.
I know, I was irresponsible.
We were on a fishing trip and I was about three or four. I remember putting it in the little wooden rowboat my dad had rented but I don’t remember taking it out. I think the next hirer found and kept it.
It has taken me a long time to find/identify this radio. It wasn’t made by a well known name. I’ve learned much about it in the hunt to track it down. Quite possibly, this is the smallest radio of its time. Some say it’s an early sixties radio but it can’t be. No radio was this small for at least two more decades. There is a clue in its name: Expo 70.
Japan had an Exposition in 1970 and small transistor radios were a thing. Japan was well-headed for microelectronics with brand names like Sanyo mastering the miniatures world later in that decade. Here’s the thing, this radio isn’t Japanese. It’s possible that another country was trying to get the jump by using the Exposition as launchpad and sending out this promotional souvenir to the Japanese and touring market. China is the likely candidate. All the online texts point back to the radio being Chinese.
The radio came in about five different exotic colours. Mine was red, like a fire engine.
If you have one of these at home and would like to part with it, it’d go to a good home if it came my way. I’m willing to pay. Currently I have an online search feed ready to capture any advertisement that contains one. It has to be red. The one my dad gave me was red.
-Michael
Michael Forman’s books on Goodreads ratings: 4 (avg rating 4.50)
Seethings
‘Forman’s writing style is artful, with the protagonist Mitchell’s warped thought processes masterfully exposed. The author has a powerful and vivid command of language and his word pictures are stark and disturbingly real.’  – Linda J Bettenay, author of ‘Secrets Mothers Keep’ and ‘Wishes For Starlight’
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